Click to enlarge<b>Introduction to <br>Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)</b><a name="TOP">

Technologies, Operation, and Systems

Author: Lawrence Harte

Number of Pages: 84
Number of Diagrams: 38

Copyright: 2005

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This book explains how DSL technology allows a standard twisted copper wires to provide broadband (1 Mbps+) and ULTRA broadband (10 Mbps+) data and high quality television services. There are significant differences in DSL technology types and these include the maximum data transmission rates, the distance DSL can operate from the modem, and ratio of data transmission in each direction.

This book covers why DSL is so important to telephone operators, what services it can offer, and more.....

Sample Diagrams

There are 38 explanatory diagrams in this book

Asymetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) System

This figure shows that a typical ADSL system can allow a single copper access line (twisted pair) to be connected to different networks. These include the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and the data communications network (usually the Internet or media server). The ability of ADSL systems to combine and separate low frequency signal (POTS or IDSN) is made possible through the use of a splitter. The splitter is composed of two frequency filters; one for low pass and one for high pass. The DSL modems are ADSL transceiver units at the central office (ATU-C) and the ADSL transceiver unit at the remote home or business (ATU-R). The digital subscriber line access module (DSLAM) is connected to the access line via the main distribution frame (MDF). The MDF is the termination point of copper access lines that connect end users to the central office.


Signal Ingress

This diagram shows a source of signal ingress from a nearby radio tower that may occur in a transmission system. This diagram shows that a high power AM radio transmission tower that is located near a telephone line couples some of its energy onto the telephone line. This interference signal (radio ingress) usually reduces the data transmission capacity of a digital subscriber line (DSL).


DMT Transmission

This figure shows a discrete multitone transmission system (DMT) system. In this diagram, a high-speed data signal is divided into several low speed data signals. Each low speed data signal modulates a sub-channel. The sub-channels are combined and supplied to the copper wire. At the receiving end, each sub channel is received and decoded. The sub-channel data signals are re-combined to recreate the original high-speed data signal.




Table of Contents



Introduction to Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)


Broadband Data
History of DSL


DSL Market Growth

Digital Transmission

Shared Voice and Data Transmission
Digital Only DSL Transmission
DSL Modulation Types
- Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK)
- Carrierless Amplitude and Phase (CAP) Modulation

Bidirectional Transmission
Discrete Multitone Transmission (DMT)
Error Detection and Correction
Bonded Channels

DSL Transmission Medium

Copper Wire Frequency Response
Coaxial Cable Frequency Response
Signal Egress - Leakage (Crosstalk)
Signal Ingress (Interference to DSL)
Bridge Tap Reflections
Audio Loading Coils
Attenuation due to Line Splices
Attenuation due to Wire Resistance

DSL Systems

ISDN Digital Subscriber Line (IDSL)
High bit rate Digital Subscriber Line (HDSL)
High Bit Rate Digital Subscriber Line - 2nd Generation (HDSL2)
Symmetric Digital Subscriber Line (SDSL)
Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL)
Asymetric Digital Subscriber Line Lite (ADSL-Lite)
Asymetric Digital Subscriber Line 2nd Generation (ADSL2)
Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line 2nd Generation + (ADSL2+)
Reach Extended ADSL (RE-ADSL)
Bonded Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (Bonded ADSL)
Very high bit-rate Digital Subscriber Line (VDSL)

DSL Networks

Digital Subscribe Line Access Multiplexer (DSLAM)
DSLAM Communication
Bridged DSL
Routed DSL
Point to Point Protocol over ATM (PPPoA)
Point to Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE)
Local Loop
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
Remote Access Dial-In User Server (RADIUS)
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)

DSL Premises Distribution

DSL Modem
External Modem
Computer Modem (PCI) Card
DSL Splitter
DSL Microfilters
Premises Distribution Network
Ethernet Local Area Network (LAN)
Wireless LAN
Phoneline Network
Coaxial Cable Distribution Network
Power Line Wiring Premises Distribution
DSL Security
Firewall
Internet Addressing
Network Address Translation (NAT)


About the Author

Mr. Lawrence Harte has over 29 years of experience in the electronics industry including company leadership, product management, development, marketing, design, and testing of telecommunications (cellular), radar, and microwave systems. He has been issued patents relating to cellular technology. He has authored over 75 articles on related subjects and has been a speaker and panel moderator at industry trade events. Mr. Harte earned executive MBA at Wake Forest University and received his Bachelors degree from University of the State of New York. During the TDMA digital cellular standard development process, Mr. Harte served as an editor and voting company representative for the Telecommunications Industries Association (TIA) TR45.3, digital cellular standards committee. As of 2004, Mr. Harte had authored and co-authored over 50 books relating to telecommunications technology. He has served as a consultant and expert witness for leading companies including Ericsson, Siemens, VLSI, AMD, Casio, Samsung, Sony, ATT, Nokia, Hughes and many others.





Description

This book explains how DSL technology allows a standard twisted copper wires to provide broadband (1 Mbps+) and ULTRA broadband (10 Mbps+) data and high quality television services. There are significant differences in DSL technology types and these include the maximum data transmission rates, the distance DSL can operate from the modem, and ratio of data transmission in each direction.

This book covers why DSL is so important to telephone operators, what services it can offer, and typical costs associated with its installation and operation. You will discover the different types of DSL including HDSL, ADSL, SDSL, VDSL, and the new ADSL2+ systems.

Explained are how DSL systems are an "always-on" system that allows users to browse the Internet without complicated dialup connections. You will learn about the key types of DSL modems include external modems, PCMCIA cards, internal cards, and network terminations.

External modems allow the customer to simply plug one side of their DSL modem into a telephone line and the other side into a USB or Ethernet data port on their desktop or laptop computer. DSL PCMCIA cards can be added to most laptop computers or devices such as PDAs and Laptops.

You will discover how DSL service can mix voice and data communication or it how it can benefit by offering digital only service and providing voice services thorough the use of IP telephony.

You will learn about the physical modulation types and signaling structures of DSL systems. Explained are the key DSL network components including DSLAM and DSL modems and how they communicate with each other using ATM backbone networks.



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VDSL2 - Very high speed Digital Subscriber Line 2: High-impact Strategies - What You Need to Know: Definitions, Adoptions, Impact, Benefits, Maturity, Vendors



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