Click to enlargeIntroduction to<br>Private Telephone Systems<br>2nd Edition<br><a name="Top">

KTS, PBX, Hosted PBX,
IP Centrex, CTI, iPBX
and WPBX, 2nd Edition

Authors: Lawrence Harte, Robert Flood

Number of Pages: 86
Number of Diagrams: 42



This book provides an introduction to the different types of private telephone systems, how they operate and common call processing features they offer. Private telephone systems are communication equipment and software that are owned, leased or operated by the companies that use these systems.

Private telephone systems are converting from company unique (proprietary) circuit switched systems to industry standard packet data voice (IP Telephony) systems. You will learn the basics of IP Telephony voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) and why it is so important to more....

Sample Diagrams

There are 42explanatory diagrams in this book

Analog and Digital Telephone Stations

This diagram shows the difference between standard analog telephone stations and more advanced PBX stations. This diagram shows that analog telephones receive their power directly from the telephone line and digital PBX telephones require a control section that gets its power from the PBX system. Analog telephones also use in-band signaling to sense commands (e.g., ring signals) and to send commands (e.g., send dialed digits). Digital telephones use out-of-band signaling on separate communication lines to transfer their control information (e.g., calling number identification).


Small PBX System

This diagram shows a block diagram of a small PBX system. This diagram shows that a PBX system contains line interface cards that connect the PBX to outside communication lines (such as the PSTN). The PBX also contains station interface cards that adapt the PBX signals to the type of PBX extensions (PBX telephones) that are used with the system. The PBX unit contains a switch to interconnect stations to other stations or to outside lines. PBX call control software coordinates the overall operation of the PBX system. The PBX unit in this example has a data interface connection to allow a control terminal to setup and configure the settings of the PBX system. The PBX also has optional voice mail that connects some of the station interface lines to a voice mail storage system (e.g. a computer hard disk) that allows users to connect to the voice mail and play, transfer and delete stored audio messages. This example also shows that PBX systems may have backup power supplies to allow the PBX telephone system to continue to operate even when the primary power source is lost.


Automatic Call Distribution (ACD) Operation

This figure shows a sample automatic call distribution (ACD) system that uses an interactive voice response (IVR) system to determine call routing. When an incoming is initially received, the ACD system coordinates with the IVR system to determine the customer's selection. The ACD system then looks into the databases to retrieve the customers' account or other relevant information and transfer the call through the PBX to a qualified customer service representative (CSR). This diagram also shows that the ACD system may also transfer customer or related product information to the CSR.


Table of Contents

Private Telephone Networks
-Telephone Stations
-Interconnections (Wiring)
-Switching Systems

System Topology
-Centralized
-Distributed

Call Processing
-Traffic Loading
-Busy Hour Call Attempts (BHCA)
-Lines per Extension

Numbering Plans

Market Growth
-Key Telephony System (KTS) Market
-Hosted PBX (IP Centrex) Market
-Private Branch Exchange (PBX) Market
-Computer Telephony Market
-Internet Protocol PBX (IPBX) Market

Systems
-Key Telephone System (KTS)
-Private Branch Exchange (PBX)
-Hosted PBX Systems
-Computer Telephony Integration (CTI)
-Internet Protocol PBX (IP PBX or IPBX)
-Wireless Private Branch Exchange (WPBX)

Call Processing Features
-Distinctive Ringing
-Call Hold
-Call Forwarding
-Selective Call Forwarding
-Selective Call Acceptance
-Conference Call
-Call Pickup
-Call Transfer
-Call Waiting (CW)
-Calling Line Identification (CLI)
-Hunting
-Voice Dialing
-Night Service
-Automatic Callback
-Automated Attendant System
-Automatic Call Distribution (ACD)
-Fax on Demand (FOD)
-Interactive Voice Response (IVR)
-Voice Mail (VM)
-Videoconferencing
-Web Conferencing
-Call Centers

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About the Authors

Mr. Lawrence Harte has over 29 years of experience in the electronics industry including company leadership, product management, development, marketing, design, and testing of telecommunications (cellular), radar, and microwave systems. He has been issued patents relating to cellular technology. He has authored over 75 articles on related subjects and has been a speaker and panel moderator at industry trade events. Mr. Harte earned executive MBA at Wake Forest University and received his Bachelors degree from University of the State of New York. During the TDMA digital cellular standard development process, Mr. Harte served as an editor and voting company representative for the Telecommunications Industries Association (TIA) TR45.3, digital cellular standards committee. As of 2003, Mr. Harte had authored and co-authored over 20 books relating to telecommunications technology. He has served as a consultant and expert witness for leading companies including Ericsson, Siemens, VLSI, AMD, Casio, Samsung, Sony, ATT, Nokia, Hughes and many others.

Robert T. Floodhas had a distinguished 30-year career in the telecommunications industry. As a renowned speaker at forums around the globe, Robert is a noted authority on Internet Protocol (IP) telephony. Prior to co-founding PingTone Communications, a provider of managed IPT services to corporations and business users worldwide, Robert was the chief technology officer of Cable & Wireless Global, managing a $3 billion capital budget and 1,500 employees worldwide. Robert was previously the chief technology officer and senior vice president of engineering for ICG Communications, driving the Denver-based telecommunications company into 83 markets. At ICG Flood pioneered Voice over Internet Protocol (IP), covering 188 long distance markets within an 8-month period. Prior to that, he worked for CenTel for 19 years in senior engineering positions. Robert serves on the Board of Directors of several technology companies. He earned a bachelorís degree in Economics from the University of Nebraska, completed the executive program at the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University, and has a masterís degree in Economics from the University of Nevada Las Vegas.

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Description:

This book provides an introduction to the different types of private telephone systems, how they operate and common call processing features they offer. Private telephone systems are communication equipment and software that are owned, leased or operated by the companies that use these systems.

Private telephone systems are converting from company unique (proprietary) circuit switched systems to industry standard packet data voice (IP Telephony) systems. You will learn the basics of IP Telephony voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) and why it is so important to private telephone systems.

The fundamental parts of private telephone systems are described including telephone stations, local wiring, switching systems, and numbering plans are described and explained. The high growth market for private telephone systems and the key trends are covered providing you with an understanding of which system types are growing the fastest and how some systems are evolving to better compete in the industry.

Covered are the different types of private telephone systems. You will discover how multiline key telephone systems (KTS) operate and why they are converting from mechanical systems to automated electronic controlled networks. You will learn how automatic switching systems are used by private branch exchange (PBX) systems to provide features and services not offered by public telephone companies. Explained are the ways private telephone systems can be operated (hosted) by other companies (Hosted PBX/Centrex) and how these systems can provide services similar to PBX telephone systems. Discover how telephone systems can be combined with company information systems using computer telephony integration (CTI). You will learn how IP PBX (iPBX) systems operate and why IPTX is the fastest growing area in private telephone systems. You will learn some of the ways private telephone systems are adding wireless capabilities and industry standard wireless private branch exchange (WPBX) systems.

Important call processing features including distinctive ringing, call hold, call transfer, call pickup, line hunting and other features are described. Advanced private telephone system features are explained including automated attendant systems, automatic call distribution (ACD), Interactive voice response (IVR) and Voice mail (VM). A basic introduction to call centers is also included.

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