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Editor: Lawrence Harte

Number of Pages: 670
Over 10,000 Definitions
More than 4,000 Acronyms






This book is the perfect solution for those involved or interested in the operation of wireless devices, networks, and service providers. This reference book explains the latest technologies and applications used in the wireless industry, assists with the explanation of technologies by using many diagrams and pictures. It is a great reference tool that allows people to effectively communicate with other people involved in the wireless industry.

The convergence of technologies and systems means more competitors and more....

Sample Definitions and Diagrams

Bluetooth

Bluetooth is a wireless personal area network (WPAN) communication system standard that allows for wireless data connections to be dynamically added and removed between nearby devices. Each Bluetooth wireless network can contain up to 8 active devices and is called a Piconet. Piconets can be linked to form Scatternets. Information about Bluetooth technology and wireless data can be found at www.Bluetooth.com.

The system control for Bluetooth requires one device to operate as the coordinating device (a master) and all the other devices are slaves. This is very similar to the structure of a universal serial bus (USB) system that is commonly used in personal computers and devices such as digital cameras. However, unlike USB connections, most Bluetooth devices can operate as either a master (coordinator) or slave and Bluetooth devices can reverse their roles if necessary.

This diagram shows the basic radio transmission process used in the Bluetooth system. This diagram shows that the frequency range of the Bluetooth system ranges from 2.4 GHz to 2.483 GHz and that the basic radio transmission packet time slot is 625 usec. It also shows that one device in a Bluetooth piconet is the master (controller) and other devices are slaves to the master. Each radio packet contains a local area piconet ID, device ID, and logical channel identifier. This diagram also shows that the hopping sequence is normally determined by the master's Bluetooth device address. However, when a device is not under control of the master, it does not know what hopping sequence to use to it listens for inquiries on a standard hopping sequence and then listens for pages using its own Bluetooth device address.


Wireless Access Protocol (WAP)

Wireless access protocol (WAP) is an industry specification that allows advanced messaging and information services to be delivered to wireless devices independent of which wireless technology they use. A WAP server is a computer that can receive, process, and respond to an end user's (client's) request for information or information processing.

This figure shows how pull notification works with a WAP server. This example shows a WAP push proxy gateway that receives email messages that are addressed to the WAP client. The push proxy gateway stores these messages until it receives a request from the WAP client for the delivery of messages. The WAP client will then download (pull) the messages from the push proxy gateway so the messages can be displayed on the users phone.






Table of Contents

Country Codes

Dictionary

Industry Magazines

Industry Associations

Trade Shows

About the Editor

Mr. Lawrence Harte has over 29 years of experience in the electronics industry including company leadership, product management, development, marketing, design, and testing of telecommunications (cellular), radar, and microwave systems. He has been issued patents relating to cellular technology. He has authored over 75 articles on related subjects and has been a speaker and panel moderator at industry trade events. Mr. Harte earned executive MBA at Wake Forest University and received his Bachelors degree from University of the State of New York. During the TDMA digital cellular standard development process, Mr. Harte served as an editor and voting company representative for the Telecommunications Industries Association (TIA) TR45.3, digital cellular standards committee. As of 2003, Mr. Harte had authored and co-authored over 20 books relating to telecommunications technology. He has served as a consultant and expert witness for leading companies including Ericsson, Siemens, VLSI, AMD, Casio, Samsung, Sony, ATT, Nokia, Hughes and many others.

Description

This book is the perfect solution for those involved or interested in the operation of wireless devices, networks, and service providers. This reference book explains the latest technologies and applications used in the wireless industry, assists with the explanation of technologies by using many diagrams and pictures. It is a great reference tool that allows people to effectively communicate with other people involved in the wireless industry.

The convergence of technologies and systems means more competitors and new industry terms. As a result, communicating with others has become an alphabet soup of acronyms and technical terms. The Wireless Dictionary solves this challenge by providing definitions of the latest technical terms and acronyms along with self-explanatory diagrams. This reference includes:

Over 10,000 of the latest wireless definitions Contains 4,000+ of the latest industry terms and acronyms
Has 400+ diagrams and photos to help explain complex definitions
Includes directories of magazines, associations and trade shows

To ensure this dictionary contains the latest definitions, 15 experts were used from different sectors of the wireless industry to add and edit definitions. Many of the definitions were created using our technical books that have been edited by hundreds of industry reviewers. Diagrams and pictures in the dictionary assist the understanding of technical terms by providing functional and operational views.

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Wireless Dictionary BK7769431$39.99